Vocal Ease Method Voice Lessons

Why Didn’t the Voice Lessons Work Better for Me? Part I

Here are some things that can hold the voice student back.  One could be not understanding what you are supposed to practice or how to practice. Another could be that the goals and objectives of the lessons weren’t defined.  I make sure the student and I are both happy with the plan, and that it makes sense to the student. I call this Solution Focused voice lessons.
Another obstacle is taking voice lessons with a teacher who has been trained classically, but not in contemporary or rock music. This can be a disaster. As John Henny writes in Backstage.com, sept. 2011 issue, “The Seven Deadly Singing Sins”, the belief is not as prevalent today as in past years, but it still exists that classically trained teachers can successfully teach musical theatre students or pop or rock singers.
You can hear the results of this on Saturday Night Live skits on TV.  The problem, as John Henny states, is greatest for women.  I know this how?  Because all I could find were classically trained teachers who said they could teach me any type singing.  I sang jazz and blues.
What happened?  I was never taught to sing in my chest voice.  And from high to low chest notes I still sang in my head voice.  Breathy is a way to describe it.
I believe as John does, that a singer should study voice lessons with someone who can teach what she or he is going to be singing.  Find a teacher who works in contemporary styles and who can show you how to blend your head and chest voice together and eliminate vocal strain.
I’ll offer even more reasons voice lessons can fall short in my next blog.
Thank you, Jane Jenkins

Here are some things that can hold the voice student back. One could be not understanding what you are supposed to practice or how to practice. Another could be that the goals and objectives of the lessons weren’t defined.  I make sure the student and I are both happy with the plan, and that it makes sense to the student. I call this Solution Focused voice lessons.

Another obstacle is taking voice lessons with a teacher who has been trained classically, but not in contemporary or rock music. This can be a disaster. As John Henny writes in Backstage.com, sept. 2011 issue, “The Seven Deadly Singing Sins”, the belief is not as prevalent today as in past years, but it still exists that classically trained teachers can successfully teach musical theatre students or pop or rock singers.

You can hear the results of this on Saturday Night Live skits on TV.  The problem, as John Henny states, is greatest for women.  I know this how?  Because all I could find were classically trained teachers who said they could teach me any type singing.  I sang jazz and blues.  What happened?  I was never taught to sing in my chest voice.  And from high to low chest notes I still sang in my head voice.  Breathy is a way to describe it.

I believe as John does, that a singer should study voice lessons with someone who can teach what she or he is going to be singing.  Find a teacher who works in contemporary styles and who can show you how to blend your head and chest voice together and eliminate vocal strain.

I’ll offer even more reasons voice lessons can fall short in my next blog.

Thank you, Jane Jenkins

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